Integrated Cranial

Integrated Cranial

Two Weeks ago I headed to Galway to attend 'Integrated Cranial' workshop taught by Jordan Shane Terry  an international educator. While there are similarities, Integrated Cranial is not Craniosacral Therapy (CST). Integrated Cranial teaches one how to properly touch the cranium, as does CST but its real success is getting people to recognise the importance of the cranium AND 'integrate' it into any therapeutic modality. 

With the amount of overstimulation in today’s society, poor quality of sleep, poor nutrition [...]People are becoming completely disconnected from themselves and live in a constant state of fight or flight

I've been fascinated with the jaw since taking Anatomy in Motion last year in Dublin and understanding the effects of splitting my chin open when I was 14 had on my movement. Like most, I knew very little about the cranium but having heard about Jordan and his background I knew it was not to be missed. Jordan is an exceptional teacher, his understanding of the cranium and its role with the rest of the body is unparalleled. 


I was already aware of the bodies capabilities to heal itself but was still blown away by the power of human touch to interact with the parasympathetic nervous system to unwind and let go. Hands on healing has been around for thousands of years but it's only recent that we are beginning to see the science supporting what healers of old were doing. 'Holding space' was the term used during the workshop, where you allow the clients body to lead the therapist in the direction it wants to go. A hold physically creates a fulcrum, bringing warmth, energy, attention and an opportunity to create space. At its simplest, it's an extremely relaxing treatment, it will reduce the fight or flight response and allow the parasympathetic system an opportunity to breath and reconnect (we even had a few snorers over the weekend). A hold for two to five minutes will create myofascial release. At its most complex and with an open client, a hold can guide the entire system through a healing experience unlocking restrictions and allowing the body to unwind trauma.  

A heavier knock could potentially shake or vibrate the brain inside the skull, disrupt nerve function, distress the nervous system keeping it on red alert...

This weekend has highlighted the importance of the cranium, it's surroundings and it's need for integration. We have all taken a knock on the head of some sort and we generally pay little attention to our head afterwards. A simple bang to the head can easily push the cranial bones against each other, creating tension or headaches. A heavier knock could potentially shake or vibrate the brain inside the skull, disrupt nerve function, distress the nervous system keeping it on red alert and do damage that we may not know about. Knowing what I know now it's not a risk I would like to take and I'm glad I had my own cranium assessed. 

I've found it hugely beneficial integrating the cranial bones with Anatomy in Motion but I see huge benefit to offering a separate service dedicated to balancing the cranial bones and the parasympathetic nervous system. With the amount of overstimulation in today's society, poor quality of sleep, poor nutrition, overuse of technology, traffic, excessive sitting, lack of movement, long working hours, stressful jobs, less time spent outdoors with nature etc People are becoming completely disconnected from themselves and live in a constant state of fight or flight. 

A relaxing parasympathetic treatment could be exactly what your nervous system needs.  

 

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